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The Smallness of Your Business is Actually Big

We work with large and tiny companies. We help companies with big budgets (that are coming from even larger budgets). We usually think they’re wasting more money than they realize. We also help people with tiny budgets. These budgets are coming from the personal bank accounts of entrepreneurs who have a dream.

The small budgets are the ones that are inspiring. They’re the ones that force creativity within tight constraints.

We’re inspired by the type of people who utter, “I need to be awesome at social media and I need to spend $0 doing it.” The folks who say, “I need to build a membership site and an affiliate program and I can’t pay $300/mo to keep it running.”

The constraints force creativity.

The Wonder Jam won’t last long if we decide to charge $0 for our services, but the tiny budgets are the ones that force effectiveness. The same is true for the constraint of time.

A business owner doesn’t have time to be constantly monitoring Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and blogging every day. They don’t have hours, they have minutes.

The most amazing thing about the Internet is that it’s providing a marketing vehicle for businesses, people and ideas that gives you as much power as the large brands. You can reach an audience just like Coca-Cola can reach an audience (and in the same space).

Let’s take a moment and just acknowledge that this is historic.

This wasn’t true with any type of media in the past. Billboards, radio, television, print, door-to-door, etc. None of those were open to the teeny, tiny businesses.

The smallness is power.

Too often I see entrepreneurs trying to pretend they’re large when their smallness is an advantage.

The smallness of energy is another powerful constraint. Large companies have to worry about operations and marketing and sales and HR and customer satisfaction and quality control and … and … and … (the list goes on and on).

When you don’t have the time/money/energy to worry about so many things, you’re forced to focus. You’re forced to keep your energy and attention and creativity pointed in a specific direction.

This is powerful.

Allow your smallness to feel big. Let others know your focus. Let them see your laser-like focus and – if they’re the right audience for you – feel it focused on them.

October 28, 2015
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